图书谷(www.tushugu.com),让搜书更简单!(本站只提供图书简介,无纸质或电子书资源服务,请支持正版图书!)
收藏本站
当前位置: 主页 > 心理学 > 心理学研究方法与技术 >

《心理测验与评估(第8版,英文版)》

下载次数:未知  阅读量:未知
分享到:
心理测验与评估(第8版,英文版)封面
书    名
心理测验与评估(第8版,英文版)
作    者
[美]罗纳德·科恩,[美]马克·斯维尔德里克,[美]爱德华·斯特曼 著
译    者
 
页    数
 
ISBN
 
出版社
人民邮电出版社
出版日期
2015-05-01
字    数
 
标    签
心理测验与评估(第8版,英文版)

目录

  1. 1内容简介
  2. 2全文目录
  3. 3在线阅读
  1. 4书友评论
  2. 5下载地址
  3. 6正版图书
  1. 7相关书籍

内容简介

这部由罗纳德·科恩等人撰写的《心理测验与评估》(Psychological Testing and Assessment)是美国高校使用率最高的心理测验类教材,出版20余年来备受好评。本书影印自该教材的*第8版。   书中生动详实地介绍了心理测验、评估和测量的哲学原理、历史背景和方法论基础,同时帮助读者学会如何使用各种测量和评估工具,并且评价它们在实践中的利弊。作者提供了对心理测验和评估领域现有成果最全面的概述,回顾了相关的法律和伦理议题,着重强调了与实验、评估相关的文化差异和多样性。人性化的阐述方式、完善的逻辑架构、极具可读性的内文以及大量有助于教学和自学的专栏,使得本书从同类教材中脱颖而出,持续赢得广泛而热烈的好评。   《心理测验与评估(第8版,英文版)》不仅适合用作心理测验双语教学课的教材或参考读物,也非常适合心理测验相关从业人员作为实践中的指导用书。

全文目录

Preface xiii P A R T I A n Overview 1 Psychological Testing and Assessment 2 Historical, Cultural, and Legal/Ethical Considerations P A R T II The Science of Psychological Measurement 3 A Statistics Refresher 4 Of Tests and Testing 5 Reliability 6 Validity 7 Utility 8 Test Development P A R T III The Assessment of Intelligence 9 Intelligence and Its Measurement 10 Tests of Intelligence

Preface xiii
P A R T I A n Overview
1 Psychological Testing and Assessment
2 Historical, Cultural, and Legal/Ethical Considerations
P A R T II The Science of Psychological Measurement
3 A Statistics Refresher
4 Of Tests and Testing
5 Reliability
6 Validity
7 Utility
8 Test Development
P A R T III The Assessment of Intelligence
9 Intelligence and Its Measurement
10 Tests of Intelligence
11 Assessment for Education
P A R T IV The Assessment of Personality
12 Personality Assessment: An Overview
13 Personality Assessment Methods
P A R T V Testing and Assessment in Action
14 Clinical and Counseling Assessment
15 Neuropsychological Assessment
16 Assessment, Careers, and Business
References R-

 

 

在线阅读

  Preface   In the late 1970s, when work fi rst began on our introductory measurement text, there were only a few textbooks available on the subject of measurement in psychology. All of these books provided students with a basic grounding in psychometrics, but in our opinion none of them did a very satisfactory job of it. More specifi cally, these books all had a variety of shortcomings that really needed to addressed.   Problems with the Available Measurement Textbooks   From our perspective, the available measurement textbooks had many problems:   ■ Reading those books was a challenge. The books seemed to us to be written for instructors to teach from. By contrast, we believed that such books should be written for students to learn from.   ■ The authors of competing books had little or no actual experience in test administration and test interpretation. The writing in the existing books was academic enough. However, the writing betrayed a total lack of any “hands-on,” working knowledge of the subject matter. One might read the entire text, cover to cover, and never fi nd a shred of evidence that the writer had ever administered a psychological test, personally interpreted fi ndings from a test, or dealt face-to-face with an assessee (or any other interested party).   ■ Coverage of certain key subject areas was nonexistent. Today it’s commonplace to cover topics such as legal/ethical issues in assessment, forensic assessment, neuropsychological assessment, and psychological assessment in business. But back in those days, any coverage of these topics in the existing measurement books was the exception rather than the rule. Cohen et al. pioneered such coverage, and Cohen et al. continued to lead the way in standard-setting coverage in other areas such as culture-related issues in assessment. As late as the previous (seventh) edition of our text, we introduced a chapter on the subject of test utility—this at a time when most other competing textbooks did not even list the terms utility or test utility in their subject index.   ■ The other books contained way too much description of tests. Granted, a book on the subject of testing must contain a description of some tests. However, back then, portions of existing texts were as replete with descriptions of tests as Tests in Print.   Preface
  In the late 1970s, when work fi rst began on our introductory measurement text, there were only a few textbooks available on the subject of measurement in psychology. All of these books provided students with a basic grounding in psychometrics, but in our opinion none of them did a very satisfactory job of it. More specifi cally, these books all had a variety of shortcomings that really needed to addressed.
  Problems with the Available Measurement Textbooks
  From our perspective, the available measurement textbooks had many problems:
  ■ Reading those books was a challenge. The books seemed to us to be written for instructors to teach from. By contrast, we believed that such books should be written for students to learn from.
  ■ The authors of competing books had little or no actual experience in test administration and test interpretation. The writing in the existing books was academic enough. However, the writing betrayed a total lack of any “hands-on,” working knowledge of the subject matter. One might read the entire text, cover to cover, and never fi nd a shred of evidence that the writer had ever administered a psychological test, personally interpreted fi ndings from a test, or dealt face-to-face with an assessee (or any other interested party).
  ■ Coverage of certain key subject areas was nonexistent. Today it’s commonplace to cover topics such as legal/ethical issues in assessment, forensic assessment, neuropsychological assessment, and psychological assessment in business. But back in those days, any coverage of these topics in the existing measurement books was the exception rather than the rule. Cohen et al. pioneered such coverage, and Cohen et al. continued to lead the way in standard-setting coverage in other areas such as culture-related issues in assessment. As late as the previous (seventh) edition of our text, we introduced a chapter on the subject of test utility—this at a time when most other competing textbooks did not even list the terms utility or test utility in their subject index.
  ■ The other books contained way too much description of tests. Granted, a book on the subject of testing must contain a description of some tests. However, back then, portions of existing texts were as replete with descriptions of tests as Tests in Print.
  ■ The art program in those books did not adequately support what was written. What passed for an art program in the books that existed at the time was some number intensive graphs and tables, as well as some photos of test materials. Photos seemed to be inserted more to break up text than to complement it. By contrast, we believed that supplemental art could be effectively used to reinforce learning. More specifically, it could be used to stimulate the reader’s imagination and help solidify meaningful visual associations to the text.
  ■ Coverage of the heritage and history of the assessment enterprise was scant. In the books that existed prior to the publication of our own, little or no effort was made to convey a sense of how all of the facts being presented fi t within the grand scheme or context of the subject matter. Tests of intelligence were presented with little or no discussion of what was meant by intelligence. Tests of personality were presented with little or no discussion of what was meant by personality. By contrast, we would make an effort to place such material not only in a historical context, but in a logical context. Our appreciation for the importance of history and context is emphasized by the fact that the fi rst feature readers are greeted by as they open our book—as well as the last feature they may see before closing it— is a listing of noteworthy historical landmarks set within the front and back covers of our book.
  ■ Books existing at the time made implicit assumptions—not true in all cases—about the level of preparation students had coming in to a measurement course. All of the measurement textbooks that came before Cohen et al. were written based on the assumption that every student taking the course was up to speed on all of the statistical concepts that would be necessary to build on learning about psychometrics. In theory, at least, there was no reason not to assume this; statistics was a prerequisite to taking testing. In practice, a different picture emerged. It was simply not the case that all students were adequately and equally prepared to begin learning statistics-based measurement concepts. Our remedy for this problem was to include a “Statistics Refresher” chapter early on, just prior to building on students’ statistics-based knowledge.

  ……

书友评论
用户评分:
请打个分吧


下载地址